The aphorisms of T.H. Huxley

Here is a sample from the first few “pages”:

Proclaim human equality as loudly as you like. Witless will serve his brother.

Thoughtfulness for others, generosity, modesty, and self-respect, are the qualities which make a real gentleman

Logical consequences are the scarecrows of fools and the beacons of wise men.

The only freedom I care about is the freedom to do right; the freedom to do wrong I am ready to part with on the cheapest terms to anyone who will take it of me.

“Learn what is true, in order to do what is right,” is the summing up of the whole duty of man, for all who are unable to satisfy their mental hunger with the east wind of authority.

There is no alleviation for the sufferings of mankind except veracity of thought and of action, and the resolute facing of the world as it is when the garment of make- believe by which pious hands have hidden its uglier features is stripped off.

History warns us that it is the customary fate of new truths to begin as heresies and to end as superstitions.

No delusion is greater than the notion that method and industry can make up for lack of motherwit, either in science or in practical life.

The man of science has learned to believe in justification, not by faith, but by verification.

The improver of natural knowledge absolutely refuses to acknowledge authority, as such. For him, scepticism is the highest of duties; blind faith the one unpardonable sin.

“I take it that the good of mankind means the attainment, by every man, of all the happiness which he can enjoy without diminishing the happiness of his fellow men.”

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.